Personal Data, Privacy & Smartphones: The Marketer/Consumer Disconnect | MMA

In June of 2020, Apple announced that with the introduction of iOS14, new privacy features would include consumer opt-in for permission to track.

In partnership with AppsFlyer, the MMA conducted research with marketers and consumers about the implication of these changes. The insights generated include how marketers and app developers are thinking about, planning for and changing operationally for the new world of privacy and data limitations. Additionally, we analyzed how consumers are thinking about data privacy in light of the Apple iOS 14 update to a full opt in system for data usage, which other companies are likely to follow.

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Some of the key findings include:

  • Marketer familiarity with Apple’s IDFA changes has increased since September. Within half a year, awareness has nearly doubled, with the share of Marketers stating that they are familiar with the new privacy protocols increasing from 28% to 48%. Still, more than half are “not very familiar” with the upcoming changes.
     
  • Consumers are less likely to allow tracking than marketers expect them to (47% vs. 29%) and are much more likely to approve of Apple’s decision to allow them to decide whether they will be tracked.
     
  • Marketers underestimate the degree to which consumer concerns about online privacy influence their online behavior. Sixteen percent of marketers think that such concerns impact consumer behavior, while 44% of consumers say it does. ​​​​​​
     
  • Marketers expect that making ads less repetitive ads (“frequency capping”) and better content quality are key incentives for consumers to allow tracking. Forty-five percent of consumers say that none of these factors would make them more likely to opt-in to tracking.​​​​​​
     
  • Marketers overwhelmingly (83%) acknowledge that the industry has done a poor job educating consumers about data usage and the potential consumer value of tracking.

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Some of the key findings include:

  • There is heightened concern among smartphone owners for whom there is no one-size-fits-all approach when it comes to navigating the use of their data by app developers and content providers.
     
  • A significant number of smartphone users have taken technological action to protect their privacy with ad blockers (used by 47%) and browser extensions (35%) the most common tactics.
     
  • Less than 1/3 of smartphone owners are aware of Apple’s privacy changes and when presented with the scenario of how it will work, they find it alarming and on average nearly half (47%) are very unlikely to opt in to tracking.
     
  • Smartphone owners are divided in terms of how confident they feel to make a decision about tracking and think that big tech needs to step in and provide more education.
     

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Some of the key findings include:

  • Marketers have varying degrees of familiarity with Apple’s announcement about new protocols for tracking that will be implemented with iOS14 (IDFA).
     
  • The majority of marketers expect a negative impact of these changes on their capabilities.
     
  • Marketers expect that probabilistic data will take on greater weight.
     

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AppsFlyer, the global attribution leader, empowers marketers to grow their business and innovate with a suite of comprehensive measurement and analytics solutions. Built around privacy by design, AppsFlyer takes a customer-centric approach to help 12,000+ brands and 7,000+ technology partners make better business decisions every day. To learn more, visit www.appsflyer.com.